Mentally Murdered – featuring MxCx, Takatak & Irritum

MM(4)-002

Time to dust the cobwebs off this rotting city’s heavy music scene. Three acts on the bill, names as follow;

Multinational Corporations – Grindcore/Hardcore Punk. Performing new cuts from upcoming splits as well as crowd favorites from last year’s “Jamat-al-Maut” EP, this grindlashkar is poised for another deadly aural assault on the senses.

Takatak – Instrumental Prog/Groove Metal. Veterans of the Lahore music scene by now, and well renowned for their technical abilities, they are on the cusp of releasing their first EP after a great response to the single “Placental.”

Irritum – Funeral Doom Metal. Masters of the almighty riff, conjuring atmospheres equally haunting and majestic. Hear tracks from their upcoming full-length album while they doom you to eternity.

Live at Opositive studio’s (308 Ravi Road, opposite Badshah Mosque NEXT to the Ufone Franchise)

Call for further details
0345-4064728 (Hassan)
0322-5345356 (Sheraz)

Orator Interview

Hailing from Dhaka, Bangladesh  – Orator is often hailed as one of the premier Death/Thrash acts of the South Asian region. A trifecta of musciains influenced by the likes of Merciless and Possessed, as well as the mysticism of the Aghori cult, Orator has put out 1 EP, 1 full length album, as well as played live outside of their native Bengal homeland over the years. Eternal Abhorrence talks to them about the upcoming Banish The Posers Fest, their lyrical themes, among other things.

orator_logo

 

 

– Greetings, Skullbearer, hope all is well at the Orator camp.

 

Thanks. So far we have been working on new songs, though we are not that active for the last one year.

 

 

– You’re playing at Banish The Posers Fest on the 11th of September. Over the years you’ve played at quite a lot of Primitive Invocation gigs, what’s the usual expectation for an event by them?

 

A very well organized gig, robust sound system and experienced sound engineer and apart from these, we expect nothing but fun and lots of headbanging from a very dedicated crowd.

 

 

– Do you think that the Bangladeshi metal scene has improved over the years due to PI’s work?

 

Definitely, ever since they started out their journey back in 2011 they have delivered us so many great metal concerts bringing bands from many parts of the world. They have also supported many new and old bands from Dhaka. PI has created a scene which was never there before, bathed in the essence of true metal spirit.

 

 

Orator_PI

 

 

– Orator has primarily been a power trio, however a second guitarist was added for a short while last year, before reverting to a trio again. Can you elaborate a bit on that?

 

We have always thought of hiring a second guitarist, even before Kapalgnosis. Re-Animator (Navid Anjum Khan) was/is a promising guitarist and we hired him. We jammed many times last year and performed twice with him on the lineup. However, he had to leave Orator because of the imperatives of his demanding academic life. We wish him all the best in life.

 

 

– There has been a marked shift in production values for Orator between 2010’s “Dominion of Avyaktam” and 2013’s “Kapalgnosis,” with the latter favoring a more well-rounded, clear-cut sound as compared to the raw tendencies of the debut EP. Can we expect the sound to get more deliberately polished on future output?

 

Orator’s sound will remain mostly like Kapalgnosis, but of course much more polished than the previous productions.

 

 

– Orator has a very distinct visual aesthetic to it, manifesting itself in the live presence, lyrics and artwork of the band, and as a result setting Orator apart from most death and thrash metal acts in the South Asian region. Was this aesthetic a deliberate attempt?

 

Thank you. If it were not deliberate then we would be confused of our identity like many of the bands out there today. For Orator everything was deliberate from the start and shall be in the future.

 

 

Orator_aghori

 

 

– Your lyrics mirror the image of Aghori, “Left Hand Path” Tantric Occultism and  other Gnostic related notions and you mention Aghoris as an Atheistic Avadhut in a recent interview. Aghoris renounce the establishments set by the orthodox Hinduism, yet they also partake in very specific rituals which signify a spiritual belief – added to that, they are devotee of Bhairava too. Traditional atheists do not usually partake in rituals or hold any spiritual beliefs, nor do they tend to be a devotee of any deity too. Can you explain this further?

 

Aghoris are not the devotees of any particular deities per se and they have many ruthless forms of bizarre practices that most of us might not have seen as of yet. Navakhanda, is a rite where they gash their limbs deliberately in nine ways just to have a strong quintessence of inner being. However, we do not take these religious practices literally. Aghori is for us a form, a hollow being that represents the perpetual orations of a decaying cosmos within and without. That Aghori is already dead and rotted away; he has no further belief nor any god to please, but him-Self. He is one with his being, an Avadhut in true form. Therefore, behold the mad Krakach, polluting the norms of established orders and purveying the essence of non-being.

 

 

– Considering that Orator is an established act now with its own distinct sound and identity, do you see Barzak – your and Vritra’s earlier band – and Orator to be connected entities or completely seperate? 

 

Just to be clear, Vritra was not a part of the original Barzak lineup although he joined in just when we destroyed Barzak and formed Orator. We did it together. And I do not see Barzak ever returning. Barzak is dead. Orator has risen up from Barzak’s ashes, separate and immaculate.

 

 

 

Orator_lineup

 

 

– You’ve played outside Bangladesh, in India and Malaysia – how difficult/easy is it to go around touring different countries from where you guys are based in? 

 

So far we have played in India, Thailand, Malaysia and Singapore. And I can honestly say that except for India, we never had any trouble flying outside of Dhaka and performing at the aforementioned countries.

 

 

– Thanks for your time, hope to see you live soon as well!

Thanks for the support! Hail!

 

BITP

 

Orator on Facebook

Banish The Posers Fest 2015

Banish The Posers Fest 2015 featuring FUNERUS

Primitive Invocation, the chief purveyors of true old school metal in Bangladesh, are back again with another show in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Following up on the success of “Metal Barbarism II” which featured Japanese death metal stalwarts Defiled,  Banish The Posers Fest 2015 features local metal acts Orator, Enmachined, Warhound and Eternal Armageddon as well as Funerus – American old school death metal veterans who put out an EP “Black Death” this year under Dark Descent Records. Flyer as well as gig details below! Eternal Abhorrence will be interviewing some of the bands as the gig date advances on us.

BITP

Full lineup :

Headlining :

Funerus  – 90’s US Death Metal (featuring Legendary John McEntee from Incantation) for the first time in Dhaka.


Supporting bands :

Orator – Death/Thrash Metal
Enmachined – Thrash Metal
Warhound – Death Metal
Eternal Armageddon – Black/Thrash Metal

Venue : Russian Cultural Center (RCC), Dhanmondi,Dhaka.

Date : 11th September 2015 (Friday)

Ticket Price : 500 TK

Gate Opens : 3:00 PM

Artwork and poster by Gina from Romania

 

Contact:

Against Evil Interview

The Indian metal scene has been growing at a steady pace over the last few years, reaching a point where bands outside of the so-called main urban centers have started to form. While India as a metal-producing country is well past the initial primordial stages of development, it’s still interesting to see 80s influenced bands such as Against Evil form from the unassuming backdrop of Visakhapatnam.
against_evil
– Hey Shasank, how are you doing?

 

I’m doing great man! Thanks for asking! Hope you are doing well too!

 

 

– Can you tell us about the formation of Against Evil?

 

We actually started in 2009 playing hard rock/heavy metal covers in a band called ECHO. We became quite popular in the local music scene and also did a fair number of gigs across India. In late 2014, we decided to make and play our own music and since ECHO has already made a name as a cover band, we wanted to get a fresh start and decided to form a new band focused on playing our own music. That’s how Against Evil happened!

 

 

– Most Metal bands in India play pretty extreme stuff. What motivated you to play traditional Heavy Metal?

 

To be honest, we didn’t pre-decide what kind of music we were going to make. We just wanted to play METAL with clean/semi clean vocals but we didn’t care about any sub-genres. We picked up our guitars, started jamming and this turned out to be the final product. Our love for classic metal bands like Black Sabbath, Judas Priest, Megadeth, Accept etc also helped influence and shape our sound.

 

 

– Not much is known about the music of Visakhapatnam. What’s the status of the metal/rock scene?

 

Well, there is no metal/rock scene here in Visakhapatnam! There are a couple of good bands that play covers/originals but absolutely no audience to encourage any of them. Hopefully, we are trying to change that and get more people to listen to and encourage rock/metal music with our upcoming release.

 

against evil art
– Your first release is out soon on Transcending Obscurity, how did the release come around?

 

We released our debut single – War Hero back in February, 2015 and got an overwhelming response for the song worldwide. This motivated us to make more music and release an EP. Since we had already written a few songs by then, we thought that it would be best for an unknown band like us to release our music first to get better recognition. In that way, we got in touch with Kunal Choksi from Transcending Obscurity Distribution who was interested to release our debut EP.

 

 

– What was the recording experience like?

 

It was one hell of a ride man! We had a great time in the studio even though it was the first time for us! It was also a great experience for us to get associated with veteran guitar player Simone Mularoni from Domination Studio, Italy who mixed/mastered the entire album. A special mention to All Things Rotten from Croatia who did the album artwork for us. Working with such great international artists on our first release itself is a proud feeling for us!

 

 

– What’s next for Against Evil?

 

We have put in a lot of hard work and effort into making this album and we hope the music reaches out to rock/metal lovers all over the world and they enjoy it. The fact that people are buying our music and listening/enjoying it means a lot to us. Right now, we are gearing up to play a few shows that we have lined up.

 

 

– Thanks for your time, good luck for the release!

 

Thanks for taking the time to do this interview man! Hope you enjoy the album 🙂

 

AE 7

Nepal Earthquake Relief

Nepal

 

“SHAKEN BUT STILL STANDING

It has been three weeks since the earth shook us.

25th April 2015 was the fateful day when a massive earthquake, measuring 7.8 on the Richter scale, hit the small Himalayan country of Nepal, flattening entire villages and causing destruction across the nation. The dead bodies piling up have exceeded 8000, with more than 17,000 people injured, around 299,588 houses completely destroyed, and 269,109 houses deemed unlivable. Just when we were trying to understand what had happened, we were struck by another tremor, an aftershock that measured 7.3 on the Richter scale.

Whether living in Nepal or abroad, it would be rare to find a Nepali who has not been shaken to the core by this tragedy. People have lost their loved ones, their homes, and their sense of security. Most of them are left grieving under the open sky, with no roof over their heads.

Though development organizations and local communities have been working tirelessly to rescue and provide immediate relief to the victims, recovery is a long road. Nepal needs as many resources as it can get to start the rehabilitation and rebuilding process for its displaced citizens, while also reconstructing its shattered infrastructure.

Nepal’s rich cultural heritage has influenced its youth to develop a passion for the arts and music; many talented musicians have been bred in this unique culture. The Nepal Earthquake Relief Compilation is a tribute to the resilience and strength of the Nepali people, as well as a collaborative effort by the participating bands to give back to the country that has given them so much.

The funds raised through this album will go to active organizations working on finding long term solutions for shelter and rehabilitation of the communities in the most severely affected districts of Nepal.

The compilation has been hosted on Bandcamp at https://nepal-earthquake-relief.bandcamp.com/

No Sir, I Won’t Interview

NO Sir I Wont

 

– Hey there, hope all is well. Which member of the band am I speaking to?

All’s as well as can be expected, thanks! Or at least I haven’t read the news in a few days, so I don’t know just how bad things really are. Hope all’s well with you. I’m Dan, I do vocals and now I play bass as well.

– Can you introduce No Sir, I Won’t to the readers? The circumstances under which the band formed, the musical influences, fellow band members etc.

NO SIR, I WON’T started when I moved back to Boston in about 2009 (I’d been living in California and playing in a band called SURRENDER), and I got together with some friends who had a mutual interest in making political punk music. It was a rocky start, people had a lot of shit going on in their lives, but eventually we shuffled the line-up a little and started playing in earnest. At that point I was singing, Jeff (BRAIN KILLER, WITCHES WITH DICKS etc.) was playing guitar, Dominick (SUBCLINIX, SAVAGEHEADS etc.) was playing bass, and another Dan (LIBYANS, FOREIGN OBJECTS etc.) was on drums. That’s the line-up that recorded the demo, the first 7” and the first 12”. Eventually Dominick moved to drums, I took over on bass and our friend Kelley (FUNERAL CONE etc.) joined to do vocals as well. We’ve all been influenced by all kinds of things, and while the most obvious influences on the band are CRASS, CONFLICT, CHUMBAWAMBA, bands like that, everyone has brought their own interests in as well. For instance I was involved with the noise/experimental scene for a long time, I love prog rock, metal… I grew up as a total metalhead in the 80s before I discovered punk and realized that there was a whole alternative lifestyle available to me. I imagine it’s different in Pakistan, but in America the metal scene (especially in the 80s) was mostly a-political, mostly kind of braindead, mostly about partying, basically another version of mainstream society, with all the same misogyny and shitty attitudes. Punk opened up a way to make music and be involved in a community based around political ideals and personal ideals that were really different from what I saw around me every day.

– The Anarcho-Punk tradition dates back to the late 70’s and has been through several ups and downs. How do acts like yourself stay relevant in the current political and musical climate?

I’m not sure we do! But for me, anarcho-punk has never been a particular sound, it’s not as narrow and constrained as, say, D-beat is. It’s always been much freer and more creative, much more wide-ranging, mostly connected by a general political outlook. If you go back to the early days of anarcho-punk in the UK, you hear bands like D&V, HIT PARADE, RUBELLA BALLET doing all kinds of strange things, looking different, sounding different. It’s not only based off of CRASS. So likewise, when we started this band we took the political ideals and the goals and brought our own thing to it. We grew up playing in street punk bands, hardcore bands, pop-punk bands, grew up in a different time and place and so the result was naturally something different, something born out of the the here and now. The important thing was that we grew up with the same ethos as the old anarcho-punk bands in mind. Even if you weren’t an active revolutionary or something, it was hard to be involved in punk around here in the early 90s and NOT encounter anarchism, not be influenced by that day to day political outlook. In the end I think that by not trying to sound just like CRASS or CONFLICT, and by allowing the band to take its own course it naturally adapted to the current climate. That is to say, the current climate of the DIY scene. Neither our politics nor our music are at all relevant to what’s going on in mainstream society, as far as I can tell! I wish they were…

 

nosiriwontalbum

– Do you believe Boston is a fertile breeding ground for politically and socially conscious punk acts?

I think it has been and it could be, but I don’t see a lot of that going on here right now. Boston has a really transient population because there are so many schools, and it can be hard to form a solid, lasting community like the kind that I think political activity often stems from. Also the trend in punk (at least in the US) right now seems to be towards a more nihilistic kind of attitude, and a more superficial engagement with (or outright rejection of) the political aspect of the music and the lifestyle. That’s a generalization of course, there are people in Boston and elsewhere who are doing great work and making great political statements, but particularly in Boston right now that seems to be the exception and not the rule.

– Apart from music, what literary, non-musical influences do the band members hold?

I can only speak for myself, but I’ve always been heavily into science fiction. Philip K. Dick is big for me, Ursula LeGuin… I think those authors have influenced my outlook at least as much as the bands I mentioned before. Science fiction has always been a forum for radical views, a way for people in repressive conditions (Yevgeny Zamyatin in Soviet Russia, for instance) to voice their ideas with just enough of a remove from reality that they could get away with it. I’m not a conspiracy theory person, at least relatively speaking, but SF has definitely contributed more or less to a certain paranoia I have about the state and about what’s really going on in the world. Lyrically and rhythmically I also take  influence from poets like Blake and Tennyson. I like their romantic, dramatic style, but I also like the more down to earth diction of people like William S. Burroughs. When I’m writing lyrics I try to balance those two things, the more poetical and the more vulgar, I guess you could say.

– Any upcoming plans? Splits, EP’s, full length?

Unfortunately we’re lying low right now, Dominick is out on the West Coast for a while. Planning to do a tour at the beginning of the Summer and hopefully make a new recording then.

– Thanks for your time. Cheers from Pakistan.

Thank you! It’s a rare treat to hear from someone in Pakistan, I hope people in the States can learn more about the music scene there through your work. Cheers! Get in touch: nosir.iwont@yahoo.com

 

nosiriwontlive

No Sir I Won’t on Bandcamp

Eternal Armageddon – Black Thrash Bastards (2015)

BTB

 

 

Bangladeshi act Eternal Armageddon started out as a melodic black metal band, with quaint and meandering tracks that built up nice atmospheres. However, for whatever reasons, most of the members went their separate routes with only main man Asmodeus left to pick up what remained in the aftermath of “Her Forlorn Monsoon” (the title of their first EP). His warcry was heard by Blasphemouranter on drums and Sarcophagous on guitar, the trio now set to construct a new sound to take the band further.

 

All ties are severed with prior incarnations of the band. The title “Black Thrash Bastards” should be a sign enough. Atmosphere and melody is traded in for vicious- ultimately intoxicating – riff-work and chaotic solos. However, the intelligent approach to songwriting that was present even on early works remains ever-present. Sing-along choruses as on the title track, and well placed mid-tempo grooves, drum fills, bass interludes show that there is method to the madness on display. The music here is meant to be played live.

 

Despite the moniker of Black Thrash Bastards, the music here is untainted and purely old school, and will appeal to fans of this strict niche. The metal on display here is not bastardized or watered down. Like a nasty pint of locally brewed ale, this material comes as an acquired taste. Stay clear if you expect anything less than Hellhammer, NME, Bulldozer, or Sodom worship. And for the die-hards, a quality cover of Sodom’s “Blasphemer” is also included. My personal pick however, would be “Satanic Whispers” and the title track.

 

Regardless of the inherent musical quality of this little demo, recorded in a rehearsal pad, it serves more as a sign of things to come rather than an all-encompassing entity on its own. Rest assured, however, until a proper EP or album is unleashed by this incarnation of Eternal Armageddon, this 5 song demo can rest easy in your collection for whenever you need a dose of third world barbarism.

 

 

EA3

 

 

Eternal Armageddon Interview

Eternal Armageddon on Facebook

Destroy Cleveland Interview

Among the slew of literature and film coming out about heavy music, Destroy Cleveland interested me due to its focus on a certain scene rather than an entire country or continent. Cleveland Hardcore of the 80s and 90s has gone on to influence bands all over the world, from Belgium to Nepal, Italy to Singapore, and whatnot. I decided to hit up Matt Greenfield, the man behind this project and interview him for the zine.

DestroyClevo

 

– Hey Matt, how’s everything going?

 

Pretty great! Working at my day job and working on movie stuff simultaneously.

 

 

– Tell us a bit about your documentary “Destroy Cleveland.” What did Cleveland Hardcore mean to you and what prompted you to make a film on it?

 

Destroy Cleveland starts around 1987/1988 with the emergence of bands like False Hope, Confront, and Outface. From there it moves forward towards bands like Integrity, Ringworm, Face Value, and One Life Crew. The second half is about the 90s DIY bands like 9 Shocks Terror, Apartment 213, Cider, Puncture Wound, etc. I delve into the early 2000s with Upstab and give props to the new generation at the end but that’s pretty much it. There’s already another documentary floating around that covers earlier Cleveland hardcore.

Cleveland Hardcore means everything to me. This film is my life and so is the music. My world changed the first time I heard 9 Shocks Terror and from that point I just delved in deeper and deeper. Seeing the last Gordon Solie Motherfuckers show at Speak In Tongues was a defining moment for me. I grew up in Youngstown, Ohio, so going to shows at Speak in Tongues or checking out 9 Shocks at random places was almost like a mythical experience. I was a young, shy kid so I didn’t talk to people in the bands back then. I just built up mystery around them.

I was at work one day and thinking about how someone should make a documentary on Cleveland Hardcore. The next day it dawned on me that I should be the one to make it. I contacted my friend’s Colby Grimes and Jorge Matthew Delarosa in Kent, Ohio, and asked if they wanted to be involved. That’s how everything started.

 

 

– Can you tell us about a few of the bands featured in this documentary? How receptive were they to the idea?

 

I have members from most of the crucial bands; Integrity, Ringworm, Darvocets, Inmates, etc, etc…I could go on and on. The scene is very incestuous when it comes to bands. I’m not referring to them sleeping with their relatives, I mean they share a lot of the same members! Everybody has been really receptive for the most part. It was hard to get Dwid at first because there was a lot of indirect miscommunication going on. People who were ill informed told him the documentary would be attacking him and was centered around two guys who don’t like him and haven’t for twenty years or something. I’m friends with one of the guys who will remain nameless and he never even mentioned Dwid during his time on camera. The other fellow I have only met one time in my life. Once we talked and cleared the air, he was very interested. Dwid has been a great help and is a really cool guy, not the character I hear in all of these horror stories from people. Some other bands that I think are important that are in the documentary would be Outface (members went on to be in Filter and Sepultura) and H100s, and really just a bunch more. I’m afraid some bands will be left out but I’m doing my best to include most. I was never into Mushroomhead or that kind of stuff. No offense to those dudes or anything. I’m sure they are nice people.

 

 

– How is the funding for the film being achieved?

 

Out of my paychecks and out of Jorge and Colby’s pockets. We raised a few hundred dollars in the beginning which was cool. It covered the cost of one of my many trips from Texas (where I live) to Ohio. This is definitely a labor of love. I have nothing to gain from making this movie. I just want to shine a light on what I feel is one of the most important things to ever happen in the history of music. Cleveland hardcore is like nothing else.

 

 

– What about the Cleveland Hardcore scene made it different back in the day from the other places in the USA, and does that still hold now? Any specific environmental or socio-political reasons that gave Cleveland a distinct atmosphere from say the Bay Area or New York?

 

Cleveland has had strong music for damn near 70 years! It was also an important place for the birth of punk. You had bands like Devo, The Pagans, Dead Boys/Rocket from the Tombs, Pere Ubu, and The Cramps come from around the area. The early 80s had incredible hardcore such as The Guns and Starvation Army. By the mid 80s, of course there was a new group of weirdoes ready and willing to carry the torch. It’s a blue collar city that was in economic shambles. Cleveland’s a gritty, industrial place that breeds rough, wild characters. The weather sucks and people say there is something in the water.It’s fertile grounds for brilliant, angry music. NYC was a bustling metropolis with many artistic options for young people. The Bay Area is awesome; the weather is nice and there’s a ton of people with money. It still has a radical history though. The Black Panthers did great work in Oakland and Berkley but as for punk and hardcore , I don’t know. I can’t really speak on it besides being a fan of certain bands. I’m sure lots of people had rich parents though. 924 Gilman and all of that stuff is really politically correct. Not many people in Cleveland hardcore make political/politically correct music and surely there are only a handful of vegans from the bands in the documentary. Not to say the people are uneducated by any means. Lots of the dudes and women are well read lefties. The only right wing band is probably One Life Crew. Personally, I am not a Republican but I think One Life Crew is a fun band. This movie isn’t about politics. Cleveland is a fucked up city when it comes to police brutality though.

 

 

– There’s a sudden upsurge of literature written and documentaries made on the smaller local extreme music scenes across the world, in recent years. What do you think has led to this?

 

Probably easier access to technology.

 

 

– Have you worked on any other films prior to this?

 

Never, but I would love to do another one after this one

 

 

– What are your future plans once Destroy Cleveland is wrapped up?

 

I want to find distribution for the movie but right now I really just want to put it out myself. I know I can do a good job. Jorge’s company The Slow Mutants and my own Rust Belt Hammer are the “producers”. I will tour DIY style on weekends and premier the movie all over the country. All over the world if I have the means. It will come out on DVD this summer and no time will be wasted getting it in people’s hands. This is a very grass roots movie and movie campaign. DIY!

 

 

– Any new Clevo bands that you would like to recommend to the readers?

 

Obnox, Fat Vegan, Cruelster, Lucha Eterna, Wetbrain, Party Plates, Fuck You Pay Me, and Real Regular. Now That’s Class is a hub for great music.

 

 

– Cheers Matt. Best of luck.

 

Thanks for the interview. If people want to follow us, it’s “Destroy Cleveland” on Facebook. Thanks to Jorge, Colbster, Earl, Jill, Joseph, Dan, and anyone that has done any sort of work on this movie.

 

Destroy Cleveland on Facebook

Djinn & Miskatonic Interview

Bangalore is no stranger to Doom Metal, as those who remain involved with the South Asian scene may know. Djinn & Miskatonic are one of Bangalore’s premier exporters of riffy Doom Metal – despite the fact that they started as a bass-and-drums Drone style act. Despite the success of that style, they added another guitarist and released their debut album “Forever in the Realm” on Transcending Obscurity India, which was much appreciated by Doom-mongers in India and beyond. With the band working on a split with Black Metal band Solar Deity as well as another full length, I figured it would be an interesting time to catch up with founder and bass player Jayaprakash – who apart swinging the hammer of doom, is also a published author and runs an animal shelter. Read on.

DM logo

 

 

– Hey there, JP. Hope all’s going smoothly.

 

It’s okay. I live in interesting times, as the ancient Chinese curse stipulates.

 

 

– In terms of creative output, how was 2014 for you?

 

It was quite a good year. We got Djinn back together after a short-lived disbandment, did a couple of gigs and now have a second album coming together. My first chapbook of short stories, ‘Weird Tales Of A Bangalorean’ was published and sold out. My stories appeared in a few good anthologies and magazines.

 

 

– Aditya from Solar Deity mentioned he would be doing a split with D&M. How’d that come across, and when can we expect new material?

 

More or less at random. Sriram, our guitarist, and I talk about doing splits with all kinds of bands and we liked the idea of going outside genre lines and doing a split with Solar Deity, whose music we like quite a bit. I’ve always liked the more, well, depressive kind of black metal. Aditya liked the idea too and I think he will be recording soon. I am not sure exactly when we will put this out, we need to re-learn and re-arrange an older song of ours called ‘Flight Of Sand’ for this split.

 

 

– On the previous record, the band’s sound was generally of a free-flowing structure, plodding along at standard doom tempos but not afraid to kick up the speed here and there, with some unexpected nods to Death and Black Metal apart from the usual 70s proto-metal and doom fare. To what do you credit the curious songwriting style?

 

Gautham Khandige, our singer, says I have an ‘anything goes’ approach to songwriting. Personally, I just get a bit bored playing one mood and style straight through a song. While I enjoy consciously retro bands, I don’t see any point in pretending the 80s and 90s didn’t happen, and it’s fun seeing how you can branch into thrash, or death, or black influenced passages and still keep it doomy. On the new album, though, there’s a general increase in baseline tempos and more 80s metal and epic metal influences. So I think the key to Djinn is a doomy core with other metallic textures thrown in. Really, it all goes back to Iommi who pioneered the turn-on-a-dime style of songwriting.

 

 

DM Live2

 
– You’re also a published author. What are your main writing influences – apart from H.P. Lovecraft, of course.

 

Peter Ackroyd, in novels like the amazing Hawkmoor and The House Of Doctor Dee plays on the idea of old cities being palimpsests, where sometimes older times peep through the cracks and become part of their own future. That’s been hugely inspirational for my series of Bangalore tales. Robert Aickman is a writer I struggle with – I am probably immensely influenced by his beautifully written, haunting and subtle tales of unease, yet I feel there is something dry, sterile in his style that I want to rebel against. But is there, or is it just the urge to ‘kill the father’? I don’t know. Other important influences are Vilas Sarang, Naiyer Masud, Thomas Ligotti, Italo Calvino, JL Borges, Angela Carter and many more.

 

 

– Do you feel that your interests in writing stories and making music converge, or do you prefer to keep them seperate?

 

There is a parallel. I favour dark themes and moods in both music and fiction. I write gloomy weird fiction and I play doom metal. HP Lovecraft is beloved by weird fiction fans and metalheads alike. I think it dovetails quite well. I may even base a song on one of my stories some day, and in fact some of my stories allude directly to music.

 

 

– Tell us about your animal shelter that you run with your wife. When did you initiate it, and how has it fared thus far? Is there much of a scope for animal rights activism in India?

 

It’s been a series of ups and downs. Currently more downs than ups. But we will keep at it.

India has a vast need for everything. I focus on animal welfare, but there’s poverty, environmental destruction, a host of social evils…you could spend a lifetime listing what’s wrong. I choose to focus on one cause, because you can’t do everything, and the plight of stray and abandoned animals in our cities strikes a repsonsive chord. My work is more in practical rescue and rehabilitiation than activism per se, though I do try to spread awareness. I think it’s the urban middle class who are the biggest problem. They are divorced from nature, high on consumerism, and want to live in a sanitised, branded and shrink-wrapped world. The joke is that they’re living in a bubble and it isn’t going to last forever.

 

 

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– Back to your band. You started it as a drum-and-bass only sound, adding guitarist Sriram a year later. Do you foresee any more lineup additions?

 

I was really content with the drums and bass sound, it sounded way heavy as it was if I may say so. But it’s hard getting that kind of amplification going on the bass out here unless you have some seriously large cabs to go through. It also limited our appeal a lot – people who would have objectively enjoyed our riffs and arrangements tended to be unable to see beyond the ‘lack’ of a guitar. But I can’t say this worried us a lot. However, I was starting to want to draft a guitarist just to have more sonic options and Sriram happened at the right time. We’ve currently added a second live guitarist, Mushaf Nazeer, to replicate some of the dual guitar layers Sriram put down during the sessions for our upcoming second album. I’d like to add a cellist some time, or failing that a keyboard player.

 

 

– Barring the upcoming split, what’s in store for the future?

 

We’ve almost wrapped up our second album, which will be called ‘Even Gods Must Die’ I hope to have it out by March/April. We are planning another split with Dormant Inferno and a few other Indian doom bands.

 

 

– Thanks for your time. Hope you have a good year.

 

Thanks for asking! And a great year to you too.

 

 

DM bass

 

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Morbidity Interview

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– Hey there. Hope all is good with Morbidity.

 

Yes, hello, everything is indeed well with Morbidity, getting ready to play alongside Defiled and other bands in metal barbarism

 

 

-“Revealed from Ashes” – your debut full length album was released by Memento Mori in July, and was much hailed by the death metal fanatics. Can you give us some insight into the recording process?

 

We recorded the album at Sonic Occult Studios thanks to MaamarHaque. The recording started off with providing the midi versions of each song so that a basic outline could be made of the riff progressions and sections. This made things easier for the drummer to record. After that we recorded the riff and bass sections and finally adding the solos and vocals. The mixing after that took quite a while with quite a few sessions needed to fine tune things and fix a few minor mistakes. The whole process took almost a year.

 

 

– How did the release with Memento Mori come across – are you planning on doing more releases with the label in the future?

 

Memento Mori is a great label! And the best part of this label is, they promote both old and new bands. We are really glad that we worked with such great label. The support was immense! We will be really happy to work with Memento Mori again in the forthcoming releases.

 

 

– Lyrically there is an obsession with the occult and other dark themes in the songs. Are these lyrical influences derived from your surroundings or any specific literature?

 

It’s more of an acquired taste, the lyricist is obsessed with these things and we just encourage him to let his imagination run wild.

 

 

Morbidity art

 

 

– There has been a bit of an upsurge in Old School Death Metal in our South Asian subcontinent over the recent few years, with Morbidity being one of the bands to be spreading this style – to what do you credit this sudden interest in old school stuff?

 

The interest was never sudden. We were always into the old stuff with very few new bands providing us with any promising metal. And when we saw all the trash being played throughout the supposedly “metal” scene before us, we knew it was up to the chosen few of us to enlighten the masses about what real metal is all about.

 

 

– A lot of credit needs to be given to Primitive Invocation for propagating old school values in Bangladesh with their live shows. What has your past experience been performing at their shows and what are you expecting from the upcoming Metal Barbarism featuring Defiled?

 

Primitive Invocation will always have our gratitude for giving us tons of support. The shows were always great with true metal headliners from around the world.

 

 

– Does Morbidity play outside Dhaka often? What is the usual reaction from the audiences?

 

We have yet to experience a show outside Dhaka. We had a few offers to go to India for a few performances but could never follow through with them.

 

 

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– Are the members involved with any sideprojects currently?

 

One of our guitarists Azerate is the lead guitarist for Nuclear Winter, although it wouldn’t be fair to call it his side project as it’s as big a band as Morbidity and just as important for him.

 

 

– Your favorite EP’s/Demos/Albums from this year?

 

This year had so many great releases. Here are some of the albums worth mentioning.
Dead Congregation – Promulgation of the Fall
Vanhelgd – Relics OfSulphur Salvation
MorbusChron – Sweven
Rude – Soul Recall
Swallowed – Lunarterial
Lvcifyre – Svn Eater

 

 

– Thanks for your time. Hope to catch you live some day.

 

The honour was ours. Cheers.

 

 

Morbidity Live

 

 

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